Published: Fri, June 15, 2018
Tech | By Amelia Peters

Net Neutrality Repeal Goes Into Effect

Net Neutrality Repeal Goes Into Effect

The controversial repeal of Obama-era net neutrality protections is officially set to take effect on Monday, despite ongoing efforts from members of Congress, state officials, tech companies and advocacy groups to save the rules.

Probably not. You won't even see the direct effects of this repeal immediately.

Under the new law, ISPs are required to disclose any blocking, throttling or prioritization of their own content or from their partners on customers' broadband connections.

Enacted in 2015, the rules sought to stop providers giving preferential treatment to sites and services that paid them to accelerate their data. It's hard to say what specific changes you might experience; part of the whole point of undoing the net neutrality rules is that Internet providers will begin to experiment with all-new business models we haven't seen before. Those Obama-era rules prevented ISPs from blocking or slowing legal traffic, or from being paid for prioritized, faster delivery.

For example, say you're an AT&T customer.

The battle isn't entirely over, though.

Net neutrality has overwhelming public support, noted industry experts. The CRA measure, if it passed both chambers and were signed by the president, would void the laissez-faire "regulations" promulgated by the FCC in December 2017, under agency Chairman Ajit Pai.

Most now have service terms that specify they won't give preferential treatment to certain websites and services, including their own.

MSU student Ryan Kiggans said he's not only frustrated by the potential of paying to get more information, he's also upset by whom these decisions are made: namely the FCC.

Any changes now, while the spotlight is on net neutrality, could lead to a public relations backlash.

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Washington's net neutrality rule casts enforcement as a provision of consumer protection in an attempt to avoid stepping into federal telecommunications statutes.

In addition, the FCC is facing legal challenges from consumer rights groups and some state attorneys general over its decision.

FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, who voted in favor of repealing net neutrality, said on CBS This Morning the "Restoring Internet Freedom" rule will be "tremendously positive" for consumers.

Supporters of net neutrality argue that ISPs should deliver access to online content and apps equally, and prefer rules the FCC passed in 2015.

But consumer advocates say that the repeal is just pandering to big business and that cable and phone giants will now be free to block access to services they don't like.

Q. Is my Internet service about to slow to a crawl, like some activists claim?

Broadband providers "remain committed to the principles under which internet innovation has thrived", Mr. Spalter said. For instance, they might charge more to view high-resolution "4K" video, while offering lower-quality video for free. It would also increase costs for consumers, as content providers were forced to pass along fees. Essentially, users and consumers of the internet will not be charged more for faster or better speeds, instead, the accessible quality and quantity of the internet will be the same for everyone.

Individual states have also started taking action against the repeal of net neutrality.

That's another reason companies are likely to move slowly, at least at first. He once said they were based on "hypothetical harms and hysterical prophecies of doom".

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